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Philipp II. August von Frankreich und Ingeborg PDF

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Författare: Robert Davidsohn.
Philipp II. August von Frankreich und Ingeborg ist ein unveränderter, hochwertiger Nachdruck der Originalausgabe aus dem Jahr 1888.
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This article needs additional citations for verification. This article’s lead section does not adequately summarize key points of its contents. Anne at the age of six, 1607. Born at the Palace of the Counts of Benavente in Valladolid, Spain, and baptised Ana María Mauricia, she was the eldest daughter of King Philip III of Spain and his wife Margaret of Austria. Anne was raised mainly at the Royal Alcazar of Madrid. Exceptionally for a royal princess, Anne grew up close to her parents, who were very religious. She was raised to be religious too, and was often taken to visit monasteries during her childhood.

In 1611, she lost her mother, who died in childbirth. Anne was betrothed at age eleven to King Louis XIII of France. Her father gave her a dowry of 500,000 crowns and many beautiful jewels. For fear that Louis XIII would die early, the Spanish court stipulated that she would return to Spain with her dowry, jewels, and wardrobe if he did die.

Anne and Louis, both fourteen years old, were pressured to consummate their marriage in order to forestall any possibility of future annulment, but Louis ignored his bride. Louis’s mother, Marie de‘ Medici, continued to conduct herself as queen of France, without showing any deference to her daughter-in-law. In 1617, Louis conspired with Charles d’Albert, Duke of Luynes, to dispense with the influence of his mother in a palace coup d’état and had her favorite Concino Concini assassinated on 26 April of that year. A series of stillbirths disenchanted the king and served to chill their relations. On 14 March 1622, while playing with her ladies, Anne fell on a staircase and suffered her second stillbirth.

Louis blamed her for the incident and was angry with the Duchess of Luynes for having encouraged the queen in what was seen as negligence. Louis turned now to Cardinal Richelieu as his advisor. Richelieu’s foreign policy of struggle against the Habsburgs, who surrounded France on two fronts, inevitably created tension between himself and Anne, who remained childless for another sixteen years, while Louis depended ever more on Richelieu, who was his first minister from 1624 until his death in 1642. Under the influence of Marie de Rohan-Montbazon, the queen let herself be drawn into political opposition to Richelieu and became embroiled in several intrigues against his policies. In 1626, the Cardinal placed Madeleine du Fargis as Dame d’atour in the household of the queen to act as a spy, but she was instead to become a trusted confidant and favorite of the queen. In 1635, France declared war on Spain, placing the queen in an untenable position. Her secret correspondence with her brother Philip IV of Spain passed beyond the requirements of sisterly affection: she also corresponded with the Spanish ambassador Mirabel and the governor of the Spanish Netherlands.

On 11 August 1637, Anne came under so much suspicion that Richelieu issued an investigation. As part of her role as a member of Spanish royalty Anne visited churches and convents across France, where she met Marguerite de Veny d’Arbouze at the Notre-Dame-de-Grâce de la-Ville-d’Evêque. As well as securing from the King the position of Abbess at the Benedictine Val-de-Grâce de Notre-Dame-de-la-Crèche for Marguerite in 1618, Anne purchased lands and transferred the convent to Paris in 1621. She was named the new foundress of the convent in the same year.

The Val-de-Grâce was commissioned by Anne in 1645, which was undertaken initially by Francois Mansart, who was dismissed in 1646 and succeeded by Jacques Lemercier. The Val-de-Grâce became Anne’s main place of worship and would later gain dynastic significance during the Fronde when Anne was Queen Regent. In 1662 Anne acquired the hearts of her ancestors Anne Elizabeth of France and placed in the Chapel of Saint Anne. Louis XIII, Anne, and their son Louis XIV, flanked by Cardinal Richelieu and the Duchesse de Chevreuse. They saw in the arms of this princess whom they had watched suffer great persecutions with so much staunchness, their child-King, like a gift given by Heaven in answer to their prayers. Despite a climate of distrust, the queen became pregnant once more, a circumstance that contemporary gossip attributed to a single stormy night that prevented Louis from travelling to Saint-Maur and obliged him to spend the night with the queen.